Meme Review

Here are some good memes!
The true reason why AC passes through a capacitor has to do with "displacement current" in Maxwell's extension on Ampere's law. However, this is a perfectly valid explanation, and it's what we call a "proof without words". Well done. (credit goes to its original creator, but with memes like this, we don't really know the original artist...)
Ahh...research. Where you can perform stupid calculations in the name of science. This is by far my favorite diagram in a published research paper (http://iposeogsekk.com/penguano.pdf). Using energy and the definition P = F/A, we can find the rectal pressure. 
Yes. Water does contain high levels of hydrogen. Also, everyone who has drank water has died. Ergo, water is very dangerous. 
Fun fact: there have been many documented cases where the public fell for the ol'Dihydrogen monoxide trick:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dihydrogen_monoxide_parody
For all the AI developers, this is the best meme! For those non-AI developers, here is some context:
When we train an AI model, we have three "sets" of data. One is the training set, which the model actively learns on. The other is the validation set, which is a gauge of model convergence. The last one is the test set, which judges overall performance by testing the model on new cases (think standardized test). An "overfit" model (think memorizing all the formulas for a physics exam) will perform well on the training set but absolutely fail at the test set
Github: a perfect place for developers, researchers, and just code junkies. Some coders take their anger out on rubber duckies (it's true!), and others take it out on their git commits (me). When code is not working, my commits get increasingly "memefied", and you get a git commit history that look like this. Yes, I was figuring out how many ways to use "yeet" and still sound well.
Furries: perhaps the most stigmatized group in society. Fourier transform: one of the most needed operations in modern technologies. I sincerely respect whoever saw the omega and thought "you know what I can do?"
This is what we call a "very useful graph".
I hate to admit it, but this is where I first found the non-small-angle approximation solution to the period of a pendulum. It seems to be some Taylor series. Interesting!
Can relate. I love this interdisciplinary and inter-temporal meme.

Website Last Edited 2-9-2020

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